Farida El Zawahry is a 28-year-old eye doctor, writer, and mama.

Her dream has always been to become a doctor, healer to all living creatures, as she grew up among a family of doctors. Growing up she highly looked up to her grandfather and role model – he was a renowned physician who had an affinity for writing.

I remember walking into his clinic to find walls covered with beautiful poetry, of his own as well as gifts from renowned poets like Ahmed Ramy.Farida expresses…

Her grandfather played a major role in shaping her whole, and he still does.

Farida and her Grandpa

 

During high school, Farida was part of the poetry club and studied writing thoroughly.

When she was a medical student, Farida published her first book “Unleash” in 2012 as a dedication to her grandfather.

Studying medicine really inspired me to put my first book together.” – she confesses.

Since then she has given several creative writing workshops at places like Sufi bookstore, Maktoob, and Al Warsha.

Farida has developed her own technique in response to the workshop attendees’ feedback, along with researching and attentively tracking what made the energy vibe most in the classroom, in order to evolute the attendees’ skills and get them inspired the most.

Setting-up the Mood in the Workshop

 

Workshop Attendees Enjoying their time and getting Creative

 

Farida at her Workshop in ElWarsha

 

Her second book was written when she was pregnant with her firstborn, at the same time she was also working at a hospital in France.

“I was at the hype of inspiration then, and thus came “Vera”!” – which will soon be released when things are a bit more stable around the world.

 

I strongly believe that the clinical gaze has much in common with the artist’s eye.” – Farida expressed –  “Physicians get close and intimate with moments of pure human drama, like Birth, Illness, Injury, Suffering, Disease, Death – physicians are in a unique position to observe, record and create the stories that make us human.” she adds.

The latter why she believes that both professions pour into one another and that the more she practices one, she deliberately gets better at the other. 

Farida in the Clinic